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By Geoffrey G. Pentland

Airplane and Markings of the R.A.A.F. 1939-1945

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Extra info for Aircraft and Markings of the R.A.A.F. 1939-1945

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V. in Tunis. Bombing up a Wellington XIV of No. 458 Squadron, 1943. Modifications to this model consisted of a Leigh Light and radar equipment for the detection of enemy submarines. Two Baltimores, "T", AH 157 and "0", AH 158 of No. 454 Squadron. Note the absence of underwing roundels. A Fiat cR--42 captured by No. F. pilot. The photograph was taken by Sqn-Ldr J. Davidson. A "Kittybomber" of No. 450 Squadron whilst operating on the central Italian front. The aircraft is that of F-O Purssey of Brisbane.

F. pilot. The photograph was taken by Sqn-Ldr J. Davidson. A "Kittybomber" of No. 450 Squadron whilst operating on the central Italian front. The aircraft is that of F-O Purssey of Brisbane. Fitters of No. 462 Squadron, the first Halifax Squadron in the Middle East. These aircraft employed the standard European night bomber finish of dark earth, dark green and matt black. I : i AVM H. F. Overseas Headquarters, chatting to members of No. 451 (Fighter Reconnaissance) Squadron during an official visit.

F. F. S. F. K. F. 's front line bomber units. Because many of these aircraft carried different colour schemes, the matter of aircraft camouflage had become mildly chaotic; consequently by late 1940 some standardization was called for. F. dark earth (a colour approximately two shades darker than its British counterpart) and foliage green with aluminium doped undersurfaces. An attempt to give colour schemes some uniformity was made with the issue of Aircraft General Instructions No. C 11, Issue 3 dated 3rd October 1940 and aircraft were to be brought into compliance with this order after the first convenient thirtyhourly inspection.

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